Green Tea Bibimbap, Naengmyeong, Ice Cream…

By greenteapanda

May 8, 2008

Category: Food and drink

2 Comments »

In the area around Boseong, many dishes have green tea added to them. When you pass the gates of the tea fields, you are sure to find some green tea ice cream. There isn’t anything special about this particular green tea ice cream, and the centre is empty. Not a great value at 1,500 won.
The second Daehan tea field sells green tea mung bean buns. Supposedly 3,000 won for four, they gave me five. This made me feel like I was getting my money’s worth.
As far as proper meal food goes, the restaurants serving food inside and outside of the tea fields appear to have similar menus. They all have green tea bibimbap, for instance. The preparation is quite different though. Inside the first tea field, a restaurant serves green tea bibimbap and green tea naengmyeon amongst other things. I didn’t even need to ask for them to be made vegetarian – they came without meat. The bibimbap was green tea on account of the way the rice was cooked. The broth of the naengmyeon had green tea added to it.
Outside, the style of bibimbap was quite different. No green tea flavouring in the rice itself, but tea leaves appeared to be in the mixture of vegetables I would stir the rice into. The side dishes were more generous. Rather than water, I got a pitcher of average quality green tea. I also bought a cup of a more expensive kind of green tea, though there were not enough leaves to make the flavour strong, even after letting it seep for a long time.
I also took home quite a bit of green tea. If you go bargain hunting in Insadong in Seoul, you pay about a third more than you’d pay in Boseong. In other words, not worth it if you are just buying 1 or 2 boxes combined with the cost of bus tickets (nearly 30,000 won each way). Unfortunately, to get the good tea, even in Boseong I have to purchase all the excess packaging as well. In addition to the high quality teas, I got green tea seed oil. It is apparently good to put on salads. It has a burning point double that of olive oil, but given how much it costs, I wouldn’t fry with it on a regular basis. Finally, the last item in the pictures below is green tea chunggukjang, a fermented bean powder very similar to Japanese natto in flavour and health benefits.
Advertisements

2 Responses to “Green Tea Bibimbap, Naengmyeong, Ice Cream…”

  1. Oishii-looking food! I am so lucky that my girlfriend can cook so well, and she takes so much pride in cooking. She keeps a thick, three-ringed binder with all sorts of recipes she comes across from any number of sources, and she then goes out to get the ingredients and cooks the food. The outcome is good food that is generally more fun, cheaper, and cleaner than restaurant food. I help her make it, but I really want to improve my kitchen skills at some point [nevermind that guys who cook seem sexy]. 🙂 I bet there is some pretty good green tea ice cream there in SK. The Haagen-Daz green tea ice cream here is bland…no matcha taste at all!

  2. You are lucky New York has so many dollar stores to get a wide variety of foods. Here to keep costs down, my food variety is somewhat lacking.
     
    Good idea about the binder. Perhaps I should suggest that approach to some people I know out here, who are afraid of becoming good cooks. On the other hand, in most Chinese families I know of, the husband cooks. The wife usually doesn\’t cook, especially in dual income families.
     
    BTW, the flavour of matcha is not particularly strong, and very hard to bring out in most foods. You would need to eat it with other bland foods like bananas to notice the flavour. If you want strong green tea flavour, you should brew yourself a strong cup of tea. There is really no other way. Most people here don\’t seem to like tea to be too strong, since it will deprive them of nutrients like iron and cause minerals to clump up in their body. The clumps disintegrate if you stop drinking tea for awhile, so I have experienced this side effect myself.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: